Tip

How to Prepare a Roasted Summer Vegetable Salad

This summer salad recipe is quick, delicious, and nutritious.

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Now that summer is here, it’s great to have healthy recipes for preparing salads that use seasonal items such as summer vegetables. Here’s a roasted summer salad recipe that’s easy to make, delicious, nutritious, and absolutely beautiful when served!

Ingredients:

  • 3 bell peppers, quartered lengthwise
  • ½ lb. small zucchini, cut into ½-inch rounds
  • ½ lb. baby eggplant, cut into ½-inch-thick rounds
  • 1 bunch scallions
  • 3 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 cup fresh basil leaves, chopped
  • 4 cups baby arugula, chopped
  • 2 Tbs. aged balsamic vinegar
  • ¼ tsp. kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Directions:
Put the peppers on a baking sheet, skin side up. Roast under the broiler until charred, about 12 minutes. Put the zucchini, eggplant, and scallions on a baking sheet and brush with olive oil. Roast under the broiler until browned and tender.

Remove the vegetables as they are done and allow to cool. Scallions will brown in 3-5 minutes. Zucchini and eggplant will brown in 8-10 minutes. Once the vegetables are cool, chop them into bite-size pieces. Toss with the basil and arugula. Arrange the salad on a platter and sprinkle with balsamic vinegar. Season with salt and pepper. Serves 4.

Nutrition Information:
Per 2-cup serving –

  • Calories:      150
  • Total fat:       8 g
  • Sat. fat:         1 g
  • Protein:         5 g
  • Carbs:           18 g
  • Fiber:             7 g
  • Cholesterol:   0 mg
  • Sodium:         140 mg

For an easy variation on this summer salad, change the arugula to baby spinach and swap the bell peppers for a pint of yellow or red cherry tomatoes. Or you can enjoy this delicious summer salad any time of year — just swap any seasonal vegetables for the summer veggies in the recipe and adjust the cooking times.

Another inspiring reason to eat more vegetables

In a six-year study of more than 42,000 women, those who reported eating an overall healthy diet—more fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy, and lean meats—had a lower risk of dying than other women who didn’t eat such a healthy diet, even after other factors, like smoking and exercise, were taken into account.

Source: J. Amer. Med. Assoc. 283: 2109, 2000.

This post was originally published in 2012 and is updated regularly.