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Ask Chili's to Reduce Dangerous Sodium Levels

Chili’s is the “winner” of the first-ever Lifetime Achievement award at the MilliGrammys—awards recognizing ridiculous amounts of sodium in restaurant meals. Most of us should limit ourselves to about 1,500 to 2,300 milligrams of sodium daily. But some meals at Chili’s, like its Crispy Fiery Pepper Crispers—with 6,240 milligrams— double or almost triple that amount. Contact Chili’s President Wyman T. Roberts and ask him to support sodium reduction!

Urge Retailers to Offer Healthier Options at Checkout

The retail food environment should support shoppers’ health, not undermine it.  Starting with checkout—one of the most profitable and unhealthy areas of the store, where extra calories are pushed on shoppers (they’re called impulse purchases for a reason)—CSPI is asking Walmart, Kroger, Publix, and Walgreens to rethink the foods and beverages that are sold near the cash register and instead offer products that support shoppers’ efforts to eat well.

 

Food Chemical Safety—Brought to You By McDonald’s?

When it comes to safeguarding your family from dangerous chemicals, the Trump administration evidently thinks it is just fine to nominate a scientist who took money from Big Food for decades while pushing for less protective chemical safety standards.

Stop Donald Trump’s Totally Unqualified Nominee for a Key Food Policy Job

The job of Under Secretary of Agriculture for Research, Education, and Economics has always been held by people with strong scientific backgrounds. In fact, the law mandates it: The statute authorizing the position specifically requires that the nominee come “from among distinguished scientists with specialized training in agricultural research, education, and economics.”

Ask Supermarkets to Remove Junk Food from Checkout

Supermarkets should stop pushing soda and candy on their customers at checkout and offer healthy choices instead. Join us in asking Walmart, Kroger, and other major supermarkets to do right by their customers and remove junk food from checkout. 

Support Healthy Beverages in New York

New York consumers have a right to know about the chronic health risks associated with the consumption of soda and other sugary drinks. Ask your New York State Representatives to support require warning labels on sugar-sweetened beverages.

Tell Congress that Americans Don’t Deserve Second-Rate Protections

Dirty food, dirty air, dirty water—that’s what we’ll get if we don’t stop Congress from passing the Big Business Protection Act.  (Okay, the real, but deceptive, name of the bill is the Regulatory Accountability Act). Ask your senators to oppose it now.

Oppose the Anti-Menu Labeling Bill

The anti-menu labeling bill, the so-called Common Sense Nutrition Disclosure Act (S.261/HR.772), is neither common sense nor provides more nutrition information. The industry-backed bill would make it harder for customers to understand and obtain calorie and other nutrition information at many restaurants and similar food establishments.

For health insurance and prevention: oppose repeal of Affordable Care Act

We need your help to protect access to healthcare for millions of Americans and protect these important nutrition and prevention provisions that help to keep people well. Can you take a minute to email your members of Congress today?

Please Urge Restaurants to Take Soda Off the Kids’ Menu

Soda and other sugary drinks are leading promoters of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease. Sugar-sweetened beverages are the largest source of calories in children’s diets and provide nearly half of their added sugar intake. Drinking just one sugary drink every day increases a child’s odds of becoming obese by 60 percent. With one in three children overweight or obese in the U.S., it no longer makes sense to include sugary beverages as part of meals for young children.