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Revised & Updated Labels Coming to Naked Juice

Agreement Negotiated with CSPI Resolves Claims

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Naked will make several modifications to the labeling and marketing of its current line-up of pure fruit, veggie, protein and boosted juices and smoothies aimed at giving consumers a clearer understanding of what is in the products, according to an agreement announced today by the Center for Science in the Public Interest.  The agreement ends litigation that the nonprofit group filed in October on behalf of three consumers who purchased Kale Blazer, Green Machine, and other similar Naked juice or smoothie products.

The consumers’ complaint contended that labeling for those Naked products did not sufficiently reflect some major ingredients, and instead focused on other ingredients present in the product that consumers might perceive as higher value.  As part of their agreement, the parties aligned to certain principles designed to help consumers readily identify the nature and contents of those Naked products, including whether such product contains only “fruit juice” or “veggie juice” or “fruit and veggie juice.”  Fruit juice is substantially higher in sugar than vegetable juice. Naked will also revise its imagery when necessary to more clearly reflect predominant ingredients.  And, Naked will make certain changes to the display of the “no sugar added” claim to be clear that the product is not a low-calorie or low-sugar food, as well as to marketing copy and the order of predominance of its juice ingredients as reflected on side panels of the products. 

“The seriousness with which Naked heard our concerns, and the good faith they brought to our negotiations, is delivering truly positive benefits for consumers,” said CSPI litigation director Maia Kats.  

Naked’s voluntary disclosure of calories on front of package will remain—such as 190 for Kale Blazer and 260 for Green Machine.  And sooner than legally required, Naked will make calories more prominent on its Nutrition Facts labels.  The company will make corresponding changes to its marketing and advertising of these Naked products.   

“The seriousness with which Naked heard our concerns, and the good faith they brought to our negotiations, is delivering truly positive benefits for consumers,” said CSPI litigation director Maia Kats.  “Consumers deserve to know at a glance what they’re buying, and Naked’s labeling and marketing enhancements accomplish that. We commend the Naked Juice team for its cooperation and commitment to transparency.”  

Naked, a unit of PepsiCo, will roll out the changes over the next eight months. Besides Kats, the plaintiffs were represented by Michael R. Reese of the New York law firm Reese LLP. 

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Contact Jeff Cronin (jcronin[at]cspinet.org) or Ariana Stone (astone[at]cspinet.org).